Articles by date

01 August 2014

No silver bullet to curb online piracy (Business Spectator)

Film companies, content distributors, internet service providers and consumer advocates have until the first day of September to make their voices heard on the knotty issue of online piracy, but it's not difficult to guess what they are going to say.

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31 July 2014

Illegal downloading is simply theft: Australian communications minister (ABC News)

Australians are among the world's most prolific downloader's of illegal videos and music and the Government looks likely to ask internet service providers to do more to crack down on piracy.

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ICANN's .IR Response Opens Legal Can of Worms by Philip Corwin, Internet Commerce Association (Internet Commerce Association)

ICANN has filed its initial response to writs of attachment issued by U.S. Courts that seek to have ICANN transfer control of the ccTLDs of Iran, Syria and North Korea to plaintiffs in various legal actions. The lawsuits were brought under a U.S. law that permits victims of terrorism and their family survivors to seek the assets of governments that provided support or direction of the terrorist acts.

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In Case Over Attempts To Seize Iran's ccTLD, ICANN Tells Court ccTLDs Are Not Property

ICANN has told a US federal court in the District of Columbia, that a ccTLD cannot be considered "property," and thus cannot be attached by plaintiffs in a lawsuit, who are trying to obtain the assets of countries that they argued have supported terrorism.

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30 July 2014

Pressure Grows on E.U. Regulator to Rethink Google Settlement (New York Times)

During the past five years, Google has taken a gingerly approach to fighting its antitrust battles in the European Union, nurturing a working relationship with Joaquín Almunia, the bloc's competition commissioner, and patiently presenting him with three sets of proposals to settle antitrust complaints that it favored its own business over that of rivals in search results.

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Right to be forgotten is unworkable, say British peers (The Guardian)

A "right to be forgotten" - enforcing the removal of online material - is wrong in principle and unworkable in practice, a parliamentary committee has said.

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Block The Pirate Bay Within 3 Days, Austrian ISPs Told (TorrentFreak)

Austrian ISPs have been told they have just days to block not only The Pirate Bay but also Movie4K, one of the world's most famous streaming sites. The blockades, which were demanded by Hollywood-backed anti-piracy outfit VAP, are supported by recent decisions from both the Supreme Court in Austria and the European Court of Justice.

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OKCupid experiments with 'bad' dating matches (BBC News)

Dating website OKCupid has revealed that it experimented on its users, including putting the "wrong" people together to see if they would connect.

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Australians embracing the internet - but as a supplement to TV (The Guardian)

The internet will soon take over from TV as Australia's favourite entertainment source as the country reaches the "digital tipping point".

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Max Mosley sues Google over sex party photos (BBC News)

Ex-Formula 1 boss Max Mosley is suing Google for continuing to publish images of him with prostitutes at a sex party.

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Internet Of Things Contains Average Of 25 Vulnerabilities Per Device (Dark Reading)

New study finds high volume of security flaws in such IoT devices as webcams, home thermostats, remote power outlets, sprinkler controllers, home alarms, and garage door openers.

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Data retention plan will cost Australian consumers $100 a year, warns iinet (The Guardian)

Internet service provider iinet has warned of significant costs and privacy concerns with a mandatory data retention regime that is currently being considered by the federal government.

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29 July 2014

A.C.L.U. and Human Rights Watch Say Surveillance Programs Hurt News Coverage (New York Times)

The Human Rights Watch and the American Civil Liberties Union have issued a sharp rebuke of large-scale surveillance programs carried out by the United States government, saying in a joint report that such practices are hindering journalists.

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London police placing anti-piracy warning ads on illegal sites (BBC News)

The City of London police has started placing banner advertisements on websites believed to be offering pirated content illegally.

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The internet of things - the next big challenge to our privacy (The Guardian)

If there's a depressing slogan for the early era of the commercial internet, it's this: "Privacy is dead - get over it."

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Mandatory Australian data retention is a rort (Business Spectator)

Federal Attorney-General George Brandis is actively considering a mandatory data retention scheme under which ISPs and telcos would be forced to keep information (metadata) about customers' phone and online activities for up to two years, for access by law enforcement agencies.

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Chinese regulators target Microsoft, over possible antitrust concerns (Washington Post)

Chinese regulators have visited several Microsoft offices in China, in relation to an apparent antitrust investigation.

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New Australian national network for reporting online child sexual abuse content (ACMA)

Australian efforts against the trade in online child sexual abuse material have been significantly strengthened with the finalisation of formal agreements between the Australian Communications and Media Authority and the police forces of Queensland and Victoria.

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28 July 2014

NIGHTLIFE.LONDON Tops Applications As .LONDON Priority Period Draws To A Close

As the close of the priority phase draws near, the most popular .london domains applied for have been announced.

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5G in London by 2020, pledges Mayor Johnson (Daily Telegraph [UK])

Smartphone owners will be able to download films to their mobiles in less than a second by 2020 as part of a roll-out that will start in London, Boris Johnson will pledge this week.

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Online privacy and law enforcement: Why Microsoft is resisting an official demand to hand over data (The Economist)

Lawyers for Microsoft and the American government are due to face each other in a court in New York on July 31st. The two sides have been arguing for months about a warrant, served on Microsoft in December, which requires the company to hand over e-mails stored at data centres in Ireland. Microsoft has already challenged the warrant once, but the judge who issued it upheld it.

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Russia offers 3.9m roubles for 'research to identify users of Tor' (The Guardian)

Russia's interior ministry has offered up to 3.9m roubles (£65,000) for research on identifying the users of the anonymous browsing network Tor, raising questions of online freedom amid a broader crackdown on the Russian internet.

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Google's next plan: Collect medical data to create a detailed map of a healthy human being (Salon)

Google already has vast troves of data -- from consumer habits, to Streetview maps, to music preferences, and of course an elaborate search engine -- and proven adept at not only storing and sifting through it, but putting that data to work.

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Australian internet surveillance scheme costs could soar (Australian Financial Review)

The potential cost to consumers of implementing the government's proposed new internet surveillance system is soaring, as a leading provider warns it could stretch to over $100 million.

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Wikipedia blocks 'disruptive' page edits from US Congress (BBC News)

Wikipedia administrators have imposed a ban on page edits from computers at the US House of Representatives, following "persistent disruptive editing".

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