Canadians Express Strong Preference For .CA Domains As ccTLD Grows Strongly

Posted in: Domain Names at 22/01/2013 12:45

Canadians prefer their own .CA ccTLD over .COM a new report from the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) has found.

In the report from the .CA registry, both businesses and individuals expressed a preference for their own ccTLD. For business, 49 percent of Canadians strongly preferred a .CA domain for their website versus 17 percent for .COM while 54 percent of individuals expressed a preference for .CA versus 10 percent for .COM, the .CA Factobook released this week finds.

Additionally, 89 percent of online Canadians believe it is important for Canadians to have a .CA domain, and 75 percent of them prefer to support Canadian businesses whenever possible.

The top reasons given for preferring a .CA domain name by users was that it is a Canadian organisation, honest, trusted, safe, secure, credible and relevant.

The results are consistent with other ccTLDs that have released similar surveys. In a similar study, Nominet found Britons prefer .UK domains. In the Nominet survey they found 81 percent of respondents preferred .UK websites when presented with a choice of a .UK or .COM domain in search results. The main reasons given by respondents were that it would be more likely to be a UK based company and have more relevance with prices in sterling and acceptable delivery charges.

The CIRA report also found that .CA is one of the fastest growing TLDs in the world, ranking fourth among its country code top level domain (ccTLD) counterparts from 2007 to 2012 behind .FR (France), .AU (Australia) and .BR (Brazil) with over 50 percent growth in this period. Other ccTLDs growing by more than 50 percent during this period were .NL (Netherlands) and .SE (Sweden).

The growth of .CA is particularly impressive as unlike many other ccTLDs such as .DE, .CO and .TK, there are Canadian presence requirements to register a .CA domain. Canadians repeatedly report that they want to do business and/or connect with other Canadians so the presence requirements mean that it is more likely that when visiting a .CA website, it is going to have a Canadian connection.

The market share of .CA within Canada is also growing as more and more Canadians are choosing their own ccTLD. Over the last five years .CA's market share has increased from 21 per cent to 30 per cent, for the most part at the expense of .COM.

The report also looked at gTLD and ccTLD registrations per capita. Canada, like the United States, is one of the few countries where .COM have a higher rate of registrations per capita than their respective ccTLDs - .CA and .US respectively.

The countries/ccTLDs with the highest proportion of domain name registrations per capita are .NL with over 400 registrations for every 1000 people with just under 300 of these registrations for .NL domain names and the remaining for gTLD registrations.

Second is .DE (Germany) with around 280 registrations per 1000 people, of which around 190 are .DE domains and the remaining for gTLDs. Following is .UK (also around 280 registrations/1000 with 170 .UK), .US (260 and minimal .US registrations) and then Australia whose registrations are reasonably evenly divided between .AU and gTLDs with around 220 domains registered per 1000 people. Following is .NO (Norway), .SE (Sweden) and then .CA.

IPv6 deployment has been slow within Canada, as in most other countries. The report notes that at present, IPv6 has still barely penetrated the .CA market, but as deployment intensifies, especially around World IPv6 Launch Day each June, CIRA says it can be expected to see these numbers rise steadily.

Other findings of the report include:

  • Canadians rank first in the world when it comes to internet usage, spending an average of 45 hours per month online
  • Canadians spend more for broadband speed than 19 other countries
  • Canada's internet economy accounted for three percent of Canada's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2012, totalling $49 billion
  • Per viewer, Canada leads the world in viewing online video.

The full report is available online at www.cira.ca/factbook/2013/index.html.


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