U.S. online piracy bill headed for major makeover

Posted in: Government & Policy at 17/01/2012 17:10

U.S. legislation aimed at curbing online piracy, which had appeared to be on a fast track for approval by Congress, appears likely to be scaled back or jettisoned entirely in the wake of critical comments over the weekend from the White House, people familiar with the matter said.

The legislation, known as SOPA in the House of Representatives and PIPA in the Senate, has been a major priority for entertainment companies, publishers, pharmaceutical firms and many industry groups, who say it is critical to curbing online piracy that costs them billions of dollars a year.

To read this Reuters report in full, see:
in.reuters.com/article/2012/01/16/usa-internet-piracy-idINDEE80F0JI20120116

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Opponent says SOPA may be stalled in Congress [IDG]
Controversial online copyright enforcement bill the Stop Online Piracy Act may be stalled in the U.S. House of Representatives as lawmakers try to iron out a compromise, an opponent of the legislation said.

Representative Darrell Issa, a California Republican, said he's been assured by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor that SOPA will not move forward unless consensus is reached.
www.computerworld.com/s/article/9223461/Opponent_says_SOPA_may_be_stalled_in_Congress

SOPA author to remove ISP blocking provision
The lead sponsor of the U.S. Stop Online Piracy Act, a controversial copyright enforcement bill, will remove a much-debated provision that would require Internet service providers to block their subscribers from accessing foreign websites accused of infringing the copyrights of U.S. companies.

Representative Lamar Smith, a Texas Republican, said he will remove the ISP provision from the bill, called SOPA, so that lawmakers can "further examine the issues surrounding this provision."
www.computerworld.com/s/article/9223444/SOPA_author_to_remove_ISP_blocking_provision

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