Articles by date

30 January 2007

More energy-efficient computers on the horizon (International Herald Tribune)

Prodded by fears of global warming and surging electric bills, corporate computer users are demanding more energy-efficient machines, and the U.S. government is preparing to issue tough new standards for greener machines.

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NEC develops technology to prevent VoIP spam (TG Daily)

NEC today said that it has made first steps to bring a new technology to market that promises to protect VoIP from "Spam over IP" . In first test, the technology has achieved a 99% success rate, the company claims.

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Mobiles linked to tumours (Sydney Morning Herald)

Long-term mobile phone users are more likely to develop a particular type of brain tumour on the side of the head where they hold their handsets, research suggests.

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Wikipedia, you are the strongest link (The Observer)

John Naughton of The Observer examines the loop between Wikipedia and the major search engines and asks whether the encyclopedia is now as dominant as Google: There are two kinds of people in the world - those who think Wikipedia is amazing, wonderful, or inspiring; and those who simply cannot understand how a reference work compiled by thousands of 'amateurs' (and capable of being edited by any Tom, Dick or Harry) should be taken seriously. Brisk, vigorous and enjoyable arguments rage between these two camps, and provide useful diversion on long winter evenings.

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us: Study: Most don't see downloading movies as 'very serious' (CNet)

Most Americans know where to draw the line when it comes to leaving a store without paying for a DVD, but downloading copyright movies is a different matter, according to a new study.

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us: New bid to close ‘digital divide’ (Examiner.com)

San Francisco is on pace to offer a free wireless Internet network in two years but a faster and superior technology, a city-wide fibre network, may come on its heels that could better close the so-called digital divide.

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The Digital Divide: Issues And Possible Solutions (Master New Media blog)

How can this phenomenon be reduced? In this article the author reviews the three aspects we must take in consideration when analyzing the digital divide, along with its possible solutions. These are the economy, usability and empowerment.

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us: Families Entrenched in Technology (ClickZ)

Technology has worked its way into the daily lives of both parents and children. A study conducted by Nickelodeon, "The Digital Family," finds technology adoption in the family is both top down and bottom up.

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Active Home Internet Users by Country, December 2006 (ClickZ)

Active home Internet usage experienced its largest growth in Spain as the year closed out, according to data from Nielsen//NetRatings.

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Gates: Internet to revolutionize TV in 5 years (CNet)

The Internet is set to revolutionize television within five years, due to an explosion of online video content and the merging of PCs and TV sets, Microsoft chairman Bill Gates said.

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ca: The Case for Fair Use in Canada (Michael Geist blog)

Last week Professor Michael Geist delivered an invited talk to Canadian Heritage's Copyright Policy Branch on fair use. The talk, which is apparently one of several they have planned on the issue, was in response to the increasing attention being paid to the limitations of fair dealing and the benefits of expanding fair dealing or adopting a U.S. style fair use provision. There is no podcast version of the talk, though you can view it here:

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Anti-Spyware Coalition Offers Best Practices, Conflict Resolution (Anti-Spyware Coalition)

The Anti-Spyware Coalition has unveiled a comprehensive set of "best practices" for identifying potentially unwanted technology. Based on more than a year of consultations and building on all of the coalition's previous work, the Best Practices document provides the clearest description yet of how anti-spyware companies determine whether software may be "unwanted." Coordinated by CDT, the ASC is comprised of companies, academics and public interest groups working together in the fight against spyware. The ASC also today released its Conflict Identification and Resolution Process.

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us: Bill would stiffen penalties for crimes posted online (CNet)

Criminals who post images or videos to the Internet of their violent exploits could face stiffer penalties under a new bill in Congress.

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us: Fox takes on YouTube in case that pits network against net (The Guardian)

YouTube has been subpoenaed by Twentieth Century Fox following the posting of what were at the time unbroadcast episodes of the hit TV series 24 and The Simpsons on the video-sharing website. The subpoena, filed in a California court on January 18, demands that YouTube provide information identifying the subscriber who posted the clips on the site so that Fox can prevent further infringement of its copyright.

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uk: Damages for misuse of internet - Microsoft Corporation v McDonald at Chancery Division (The Times)

An internet service provider, as well as internet users, had a right of action to seek damages and an injunction against the sender of unsolicited electronic communications. Mr Justice Lewison so held in the Chancery Division on December 12, 2006, when allowing the application of Microsoft Corporation for damages and an injunction for damage it claimed had been caused by the transmission of unsolicited electronic communications by Paul McDonald.

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uk: Online fraud 'now major concern' (BBC)

Britons fear being ripped-off online more than gun crime, climate change or even contracting MRSA in hospital, a survey has suggested.

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Revealed: how eBay sellers fix auctions (The Times)

Customers of the internet auction site eBay are being defrauded by unscrupulous dealers who secretly bid up the price of items

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Building a Safer MySpace (Business Week)

News Corp.'s online social network has come a long way in setting safeguards to protect minors, but the work is only starting

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These men are unforgivable (The Times)

One of the things that really disgusts the author of this piece about users of child pornography is that we probably all know at least one. Internet sites featuring the abuse of children are practically two a penny: the laws of supply and demand suggest that people's appetite for them is vast (the author doesn't buy the feeble Pete Townshend-style argument about "curiosity". Most "curious" people don't need to see what children look like while they're being raped).

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Why phishing works by Rachna Dhamija, J. D. Tygar & Marti Hearst (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems)

To build systems shielding users from fraudulent (or phishing) websites, designers need to know which attack strategies work and why. This paper provides the first empirical evidence about which malicious strategies are successful at deceiving general users. We first analyzed a large set of captured phishing attacks and developed a set of hypotheses about why these strategies might work. We then assessed these hypotheses with a usability study in which 22 participants were shown 20 web sites and asked to determine which ones were fraudulent. We found that 23% of the participants did not look at browser-based cues such as the address bar, status bar and the security indicators, leading to incorrect choices 40% of the time. We also found that some visual deception attacks can fool even the most sophisticated users. These results illustrate that standard security indicators are not effective for a substantial fraction of users, and suggest that alternative approaches are needed.

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Applicable Law Aspects of Copyright Infringement on the Internet: What Principles Should Apply? by Andrea Anotelli (Singapore Journal of Legal Studies)

Abstract: Digital technology, and particularly the Internet, is reducing the cost of publishing works, but has also made the unauthorised copying and distributing of works virtually costless. Despite the level of harmonisation of copyright laws worldwide, achieved through the Berne Convention, the TRIPs Agreement and WIPO Copyright Treaty, such copyright infringements on the Internet still give rise to a number of relevant conflict of laws issues. This article focuses on the analysis of the applicable law rules provided under the Berne Convention in relation to economic and moral rights in the light of the various technical scenarios of copyright infringement in cyberspace. From this perspective, it also attempts to assess if and to what extent it is possible to attribute a new meaning to too often datable applicable law principles.

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Defamatory Internet Speech: A Defense of the Status Quo by Anthony Ciolli (Quinnipiac Law Review)

Abstract: This brief essay is a critique of Glenn Reynold's paper Libel in the Blogosphere: Some Preliminary Thoughts. I conclude that Reynolds's proposal to treat defamatory internet and blog speech as slander, while well-intentioned, would have a devastating impact on defamation victims' ability to recover due to the interplay between Reynold's proposal and Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.

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Internet Defamation and Choice of Law in Dow Jones & Company Inc. v. Gutnick by Gary K Y Chan (Singapore Journal of Legal Studies)

Abstract: This article focuses on choice of law in the context of Internet defamation with reference to a recent Australian High Court decision, Dow Jones v. Gutnick. The case raised a myriad of issues ranging from comparative defamation laws (and value systems) of the United States versus Australia, the meaning of "publication" and the need for Internet-specific legal reforms. These issues interact with and have an impact upon the choice of law problem. This article discusses the various alternatives for resolving the choice of law problem. It concludes by tentatively recommending some choice of law rules in the context of Internet defamation.

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Current Responses to Sexual Grooming: Implication for Prevention by Samantha Craven, Sarah Brown & Elizabeth Gilchrist (Howard Journal of Criminal Justice)

Abstract: This article aims to outline current responses to sexual grooming; specific attention will be given to new legislation introduced in England and Wales under the Sexual Offences Act 2003. Following an outline of this new legislation, consideration will be given to its effectiveness, including practical difficulties that are likely to restrict its scope. Issues to be discussed include: poor definition and understanding of sexual grooming, scope of legislation in relation to non-Internet grooming, difficulties in identifying sexual grooming, and a failure of the new legislation to be truly preventative. The article concludes by supporting Richard Laws's suggestion that the most effective prevention of child sexual abuse would result from adopting a public health approach.

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China's Network Justice by Benjamin L. Liebman & Tim Wu (Social Science Research Network)

Abstract: This article, the product of extensive interviews across China, asks the following question: What has China's internet revolution meant for its legal system? What does cheaper if not free speech mean for Chinese judges?

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