Articles by date

23 July 2009

All the news that's free to print: Is charity the newspaper industry's last, best hope? (The Economist)

"What's black and white and red all over?" the television interviewer asks Bill Keller, editor-in-chief of the New York Times. Having heard this one before, Mr Keller, without a second thought, replies "A newspaper" -- and walks into the sucker punch. "No," says the interviewer, from "The Daily Show", a satirical news programme, "your balance-sheets."

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China cracks down on social websites (Stuff)

Two more websites dedicated to social networking went offline in China amid tightening controls that have blocked Facebook, Twitter and other popular sites that offered many Chinese a rare taste of free expression.

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Reaching Out to the World With Twitter (New York Times)

... For many mom-and-pop shops with no ad budget, Twitter has become their sole means of marketing. It is far easier to set up and update a Twitter account than to maintain a Web page. And because small-business owners tend to work at the cash register, not in a cubicle in the marketing department, Twitter’s intimacy suits them well.

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Video online grows beyond Australian industry hopes (Sydney Morning Herald)

If there was any doubt that Australians were developing an insatiable appetite for TV-style video online, the sceptics can return to their dens.

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Phone gadget to diagnose disease (BBC News)

Researchers have developed an add-on to a mobile phone that can take detailed images and analyse them to diagnose diseases such as tuberculosis.

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Mideast, Africa mobile broadband to explode: report (Reuters)

Mobile broadband in the Middle East and Africa will expand to $6 billion (£243 billion) in the next two years from the current $1 billion, spurred by an expanding network and falling prices, a telecoms advisory firm has said.

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U.S. Withheld Data on Risks of Distracted Driving (New York Times)

In 2003, researchers at a federal agency proposed a long-term study of 10,000 drivers to assess the safety risk posed by cellphone use behind the wheel.

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Growing Mobile Internet Use Shrinks America's Digital Divide: Pew Report (New York Times)

... The survey, conducted in April by interviewing 2,253 Americans, found that while accessing the Internet via a mobile phone was increasing, the swell was reflected most sharply among African-Americans.

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China censors block President's son from internet search results (The Times)

China's censors have added a new word to the list of those banned on domestic search engines: the name of the son of President Hu Jintao.

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Death threats in Australian SMS scam (Australian IT)

Death threats in SMS scam International money launderers may be behind a recent spate of threatening SMS text messages, according to a senior information security analyst.

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Twitter: A Growing Security Minefield (PC World)

In June, the world watched as tweets from the streets of Tehran flooded Twitter. Frequent Twitter users--and people who hadn't even heard of the microblogging service--were suddenly and simultaneously witnessing its potential.

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22 July 2009

Victorian Govt urged to act after school suicides (ABC News)

The Victorian Government has sent extra counsellors to a school in the state's south, after four current or former students committed suicide in six months.

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Global internet population to hit 2.2 billion by 2013 (Computing)

The number of online users is set to grow 45 per cent to 2.2 billion users in 2013, according to analyst Forrester Research.

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Tech 'has changed foreign policy': British PM (BBC News)

Tech's inroads to a "global society" will influence its governance, Mr Brown said. Technology means that foreign policy will never be the same again, the prime minister said at a meeting of leading thinkers in Oxford.

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U.S. Named As Top Spam-Producing Country (PC Advisor)

The US has been named the world's biggest spam-producing country. Security firm Sophos said the US was responsible for 15.6 percent of all spam received between April and June this year - that's one in every six junk emails.

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21 July 2009

Plans for Microsoft and Yahoo to take on Google (The Independent)

Yahoo executives are to be questioned today on reports that they may be ready to set aside their differences with Microsoft and make an alliance against a common enemy: Google.

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Google Wins British Libel Case (New York Times)

Google is not liable for defamatory material that appears in its search results, a British judge has ruled, a decision that lawyers call significant because of the country's reputation as a haven for libel claimants.

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Four million British identities are up for sale on the internet (The Times)

The identities of more than four million Britons are being offered for sale on the internet, The Times has learnt.

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Falun Gong seeks U.S. support in Internet censor fight (Reuters)

Ten years after a government crackdown drove it underground in China, Falun Gong is trying to position itself to get U.S. government funds to help defeat Internet censors worldwide.

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20 July 2009

Forbes and The Financial Times on New gTLD Proposal

Forbes and The Financial Times both look at th ICANN proposal to open up the gTLD space allowing for an unlimited number of new generic Top Level Domains. Both articles look at some of the issues involved, including the problem of cybersquatting, an issue feared by many large trademark holders.

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The Domain Name Business (BusinessWeek)

Sedo's Jeremiah Johnston talks to BusinessWeek and explains how entrepreneurs can acquire, improve and sell domain names in this article.

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Music Industry Lures 'Casual' Pirates to Legal Sites (New York Times)

Record company executives say there are three kinds of music fans. There are those who buy music, and those who get a kick out of never paying for it. And then there are those whom Rob Wells at Universal Music Group calls "dinner party pirates": the vast majority of listeners, those who copy music illegally because it is more convenient than buying it.

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Kazaa to rise from the dead (Sydney Morning Herald)

The notorious Kazaa peer-to-peer file sharing service is back from the dead three years after it was shut down by the music industry in a $150 million lawsuit.

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Why Japan's Mobile Phones Haven't Gone Global (New York Times)

At first glance, Japanese cellphones are a gadget lover's dream: ready for Internet and e-mail, they double as credit cards, boarding passes and even body-fat calculators. But it is hard to find anyone in Chicago or London using a Japanese phone like a Panasonic, a Sharp or an NEC. Despite years of dabbling in overseas markets, Japan's handset makers have little presence beyond the country's shores.

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Mobile apps 'to be bigger than internet' (BBC News)

The market for mobile applications, or apps, will become "as big as the internet", peaking at 10 million apps in 2020, a leading storefront believes.

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